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Coquitlam, Port Moody and Port Coquitlam May 2017 Market Report

One thing is for certain on the eve of the 2017 BC provincial election, the provincial government has very little control over the price of real estate. At this point in time, the media has very little idea of what’s happening in the market, which tells me that coverage of the “housing crisis” and discussion surrounding affordability of housing can largely be ignored. If the media can’t even be aware of a red hot market surge occurring under their noses, what good are they? All the editorializing and hot air being put out by media pundits really doesn’t amount to much if they don’t report on this hot market.

This is what has occurred since January 2017: The attached market has continued to be strongly in sellers territory in Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam and Port Moody. The all important ratio of sales to active listings went from “strong” in January and February, to hyper speed in March and April. In both those months, demand outsold supply causing significant price jumps. When listing an apartment or townhouse pretty much anywhere in the Tri City, expect multiple offers and crazy sale prices.

The detached market, which slowed down significantly after the August 2016 15% foreign buyers tax, suddenly woke up in March. Sales to active listings ratios doubled from February to April even while inventories climbed. How long will this last? One can only speculate. A change in government on May 9th will have an effect as buyers most likely take a wait and see approach as a hedge against possible policy changes listings.

Look For a Busy Spring Real Estate Market!

This past weekend I wrote an offer for my buyer client on an apartment in near Coquitlam Centre mall. There are a number of new or newer buildings in the area. This particular apartment had been on the market for about 6 weeks. My buyer fell in love with it and after a 2nd look at it, decided to write an offer. My client is a 1st time buyer. Because of that there was plenty of ground to cover, i.e., how do things work?, what normally happens when…? etc.. To make matters a bit more complicated, the listing realtor was very inexperienced. I had to explain a lot of procedures to him, which wasn’t a problem really. At any rate, after submitting my offer, I was informed that 2 more offers were written and another 2 were possibly being written. What excitement! Needless to say, my 1st time buyer was taken aback. After sitting idle for 6 weeks, how could this property suddenly spring to life. The answer is that holidays and snow have hampered the market over the past few weeks and a backlog of buying activity has been created. That backlog is now playing out in the attached market certainly and I think the detached market is should perk up quickly too. Look for a busy Spring real estate market in Coquitlam, Port Moody and Port Coquitlam.

Breakfast with Santa

We hosted a very successful event on Saturday, November 26th at Port Moody’s St. Street Grill. More than 50 clients and their children, grandchildren, and friends enjoyed an excellent brunch buffet and a visit from Santa. We love hosting events like this! It allows us to catch up with clients, see their kids and grandchildren and give back to the community. We asked our guests to bring a donation for the food bank and we ended up with about 100 pounds of food for Share Society in Port Moody.

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November 2nd, 2016 Market Update

Of course, everything is dependent on supply and demand, but falling prices are triggered by sellers who “have to sell”. When demand slackens, like it’s doing right now, the market tends to get a bit flooded with product. Out of the many hundreds of sellers, a few can be categorized as “have to sell”, while others are just testing or don’t “have to sell”. As time wears on, buyers have more selection and don’t feel pressure to act. This causes buyers to be less willing to commit, even when they find a great property. Sellers who “have to sell”, see this happening and will react in the only timely way they can, they will reduce their price.
Examples of sellers that “have to sell” are foreclosures, estate sales (perhaps), sellers that have bought already, sellers that are especially motivated to make a change in their home and sellers that just need the cash. Out of the hundreds of sellers on the market, I’d say 25% could be motivated “have to sell” sellers.
So, when demand falls and supply increases, sellers that have to sell must go to the market. They must price their homes to entice reluctant buyers to commit. This will happen over and over again until the market gets into a more balanced situation. It’s happening right now in this current market cycle, it has to. Prices are down from their peak by about 15% in Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam and Port Moody. Its up to buyers as a collective whole to decide how far prices fall. When the collective whole feels that homes are a good deal, they will start to buy again.
This current downturn in demand is not being caused by typical factors like rising interest rates or falling wages. It’s being caused by general buyer sentiment. In other words, it’s a crisis of confidence. That tells me that buyers will return to the market in larger numbers when prices have fallen to a point where they seem like a good deal. That sounds simplistic I know, but it’s how it is.

October stats report

Of course, everything is dependent on supply and demand, but falling prices are triggered by sellers “have to sell”. When demand slackens, like it’s doing right now, the market tends to get a bit flooded with product. Out of the many hundreds of seller, a few can be categorized as “have to sell”, while others are just testing or don’t “have to sell”. As time wears on, buyers have more selection and don’t feel pressure to act. This causes buyers to be less willing to commit, even when they find a great property. Sellers that “have to sell”, see this happening and will react in the only timely way they can. They will reduce their price.
Examples of sellers that “have to sell” are foreclosures, estate sales (perhaps), sellers that have bought already, sellers that are especially motivated to make a change in their home and sellers that just need the cash. Out of the hundreds of sellers on the market, I’d say 25% could be motivated “have to sell” sellers.
So, when demand falls and supply increases, sellers that have to sell must go to the market. They must price their homes to entice reluctant buyers to commit. This will happen over and over again until the market gets into a more balanced situation. It’s happening right now in this current market cycle, it has to. Prices are down from their peak by about 15% in Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam and Port Moody. It’s up to buyers as a collective whole as to how far prices fall. When the collective whole feels that homes are a good deal, they will start to buy again. 
This current downturn in demand is not being caused by typical factors like rising interest rates or falling wages. It’s being caused by general buyer sentiment. In other words, it’s a crisis of confidence. What that tells me is that buyers will return to the market in larger numbers when prices have fallen to a point where they seem like a good deal. That sounds simplistic I know but it’s how it is.